A Christmas thought for the week

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This Sunday will be the fourth Sunday in Advent and it is traditionally the time for nativity plays.

There are many stories of children ad-libbing and parents cringing as the youngsters make up their own words when they go ‘off script’.

The nativity scene at Campbeltown Community Carol Service. 25_c50carols10

One of my favourites is about the wee boy who looked into the crib and said: ‘Isn’t he like his dad?’

The congregation laughed, as they knew these were not the scripted words – but had this wee boy not just got the gospel in a nutshell?

He had heard his mum say this of the new baby next door, so he thought it an appropriate thing to say.

How right he was.

‘Isn’t he like his dad?’ Is this not the message of Christmas?

Of course, we do not know what Jesus looked like physically, but that doesn’t matter. ‘Isn’t he like his dad?’

Jesus came to show us what God was like and from the very beginning God set the stage of his nativity.

Jesus was born in poverty, a refugee without a place to live, so his parents borrowed the lowliest of places – so the story goes.

Jesus’ birth and his life emphasise that God’s message was for the ordinary folk, those who were not important to the rich or the powerful, but who were important to God.

As Jesus grew he made his home and his life with those the world rejected, with those the world despised because those were the ones who found special favour with God.

Jesus came to bring God’s inclusive love to everyone and to love everyone in this wonderful kingdom.

‘Isn’t he just like his dad’.

May God bless you at this very special time.